The Jubilee Year of Mercy: No matter how battered, bruised or broken…

'You have redeemed us, Lord, with your blood' Image of the Most Holy Redeemer, Esker Church

‘THE FACE OF MERCY’  is the name of the document of Pope Francis, announcing this special year of Jubilee in the whole Church. We will include more information on this, in the coming days, in order to help us to understand what this special Holy Year is about. (Ed.)

(While writing this, I hear in the background ‘All are Welcome’ by Marty Haugen, a hymn of great welcome. It fits in with the Jubilee of Mercy beginning now. Listen to it here on Youtube, even as you read on, below.)

Hot off the lips of Pope Francis: On December 8th, Feast of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, the Jubilee of Mercy Year was launched by Pope Francis, in St. Peter’s Square, with the opening of the Holy Door, – a custom reserved for years of Jubilee in the Church. Among other things, he said:

This Extraordinary Year is itself a gift of grace.  To pass through the Holy Door means to rediscover the infinite mercy of the Father who welcomes everyone and goes out personally to encounter each of them.  It is he who seeks us!  It is he who comes to encounter us!  This will be a year in which we grow ever more convinced of God’s mercy.  How much wrong we do to God and his grace when we speak of sins being punished by his judgment before we speak of their being forgiven by his mercy (cf. Saint Augustine, De Praedestinatione Sanctorum, 12, 24)!  But that is the truth.  We have to put mercy before judgment, and in any event God’s judgement will always be in the light of his mercy.  In passing through the Holy Door, then, may we feel that we ourselves are part of this mystery of love, of tenderness.  Let us set aside all fear and dread, for these do not befit men and women who are loved.  Instead, let us experience the joy of encountering that grace which transforms all things.

Click here for full text of his homily on December 8th, 2015.

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(A few extracts from the letter of Pope Francis declaring an Extraordinary Year of Mercy, -beginning December 8th 2015, ending on Feast of Christ the King, 2016.)

1. Jesus Christ is the face of the Father’s mercy. These words might well sum up the mystery of the Christian faith. Mercy has become living and visible in Jesus of Nazareth, reaching its culmination in him. The Father, “rich in mercy” (Eph 2:4), after having revealed his name to Moses as “a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness” (Ex 34:6), has never ceased to show, in various ways throughout history, his divine nature. In the “fullness of time” (Gal 4:4), when everything had been arranged according to his plan of salvation, he sent his only Son into the world, born of the Virgin Mary, to reveal his love for us in a definitive way. Whoever sees Jesus sees the Father (cf. Jn 14:9). Jesus of Nazareth, by his words, his actions, and his entire person[1] reveals the mercy of God.

2. We need constantly to contemplate the mystery of mercy. It is a wellspring of joy,

Not matter how battered, bruised or broken... !

serenity, and peace. Our salvation depends on it. Mercy: the word reveals the very mystery of the Most Holy Trinity. Mercy: the ultimate and supreme act by which God comes to meet us. Mercy: the fundamental law that dwells in the heart of every person who looks sincerely into the eyes of his brothers and sisters on the path of life. Mercy: the bridge that connects God and man, opening our hearts to the hope of being loved forever despite our sinfulness.

3. At times we are called to gaze even more attentively on mercy so that we may become a

more effective sign of the Father’s action in our lives. For this reason I have proclaimed an Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy as a special time for the Church, a time when the witness of believers might grow stronger and more effective.

The Holy Year will open on 8 December 2015, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception.

'With God there is fullness of Redemption' (Ps.130) Jesus knocks at our door, and waits for us to open up. (From St. Colmcille Church, Glencolmcille, Co. Donegal)

…When faced with the gravity of sin, God responds with the fullness of mercy. Mercy will always be greater than any sin, and no one can place limits on the love of God who is ever ready to forgive. I will have the joy of opening the Holy Door on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception. On that day, the Holy Door will become a

'See, I stand at the door, knocking' (Revelations 3:20) - On a room door in Esker Monastery

Door of Mercy through which anyone who enters will experience the love of God who consoles, pardons, and instills hope…

May the Holy Spirit, who guides the steps of believers in cooperating with the work of

The Holy Spirit, The Alpha & the Omega: Glencolmcille Church, Donegal.

salvation wrought by Christ, lead the way and support the People of God so that they may contemplate the face of mercy…

With our eyes fixed on Jesus and his merciful gaze, we experience the love of the Most Holy Trinity. The mission Jesus received from the Father was that of revealing the mystery of divine love in its fullness. “God is love” (1 Jn 4:8,16), John affirms for the first and only time in all of Holy Scripture. This love has now been made visible and tangible in Jesus’ entire life. His person is nothing but love, a love given gratuitously. The relationships he forms with the people who approach him manifest something entirely unique and unrepeatable. The signs he works, especially in favour of sinners, the poor, the marginalized, the sick, and the suffering, are all meant to teach mercy. Everything in him speaks of mercy. Nothing in him is devoid of compassion.

Jesus, seeing the crowds of people who followed him, realized that they were tired and exhausted, lost and without a guide, and he felt deep compassion for them (cf. Mt 9:36)…

We are called to show mercy because mercy has first been shown to us. Pardoning offences becomes the clearest expression of merciful love, and for us Christians it is an imperative from which we cannot excuse ourselves. At times how hard it seems to forgive! And yet pardon is the instrument placed into our fragile hands to attain serenity of heart. To let go of anger, wrath, violence, and revenge are necessary conditions to living joyfully. Let us therefore heed the Apostle’s exhortation: “Do not let the sun go down on your anger” (Ephesians 4:26).

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